News and Events

Upcoming Events

Public Seminar Series, Hilary term 2022

Race, Borders, and Global (Im)mobility

Series convenor: Dr Hanno Brankamp, Departmental Lecturer in Forced Migration

This seminar series critically interrogates the ways in which militarised borders, migration enforcement, and their racial orderings continue to be normalised on a global scale. The political drive towards expanding walls, policing infrastructures, camps, detention centres, interceptions at sea, push backs, deportations, surveillance, and racist immigration policies that restrict asylum and migration is hereby not only a legacy of past empires but is also indicative of new emerging geographies of (im)mobility, racialisation, and liberal violence. Speakers in this series come from a range of disciplines and will examine global migration through questions of race and racism, coloniality, nationalism, citizenship, belonging, criminalisation, and bordering.

  1. March 2, 2022 - 9:00am to 10:30am
In response to exploitation, criminalization, and mass detention and deportation of migrants in the US, migrant justice activism has become a central feature of United States politics. The movement is politically and tactically diverse. Some organizing efforts more actively engage with critiques of and struggles against capitalism than others. This panel brings together three activists and thinkers to discuss the anti-capitalist work that is already happening, the obstacles that currently stand in the way of anti-capitalist approaches, the possibilities for anti-capitalist mobilizations in the future, and the connections to other struggles for justice and liberation. We invite you to think with us about how to fight for migrant justice and a post-capitalist future.  
 
  1. March 4, 2022 - 9:00am

In this webcast, an interdisciplinary group of Cornell University experts will discuss how the concept of invasion characterizes the movements of humans, plants, and animals as threatening. They’ll dive into the range of work that address "invasive species," exploring how it aligns with or diverges from human-centered notions of invasion. In discussing this fraught concept, this panel of scholars in anthropology, ecology, evolutionary biology, and geography will also address what research that examines or problematizes “invasion” reveals about our understanding of borders and mobility.
This event is part of our Migrations series, sponsored by Cornell’s Migrations initiative

WHAT YOU'LL LEARN

  • How different disciplinary perspectives approach migration as a multi-species phenomenon
  • How the problematic discourse on “invasion” in the context of human migration may apply across species
  • The ways in which these interdisciplinary views on movement can deepen our understanding of borders and migration

 

  1. March 7, 2022 - 10:00am

Associate Professor of Sociology and Director of the Mexican Migration Field Research Program at UCSD Abigail Andrews will join Associate Professor in Educational Foundations, Policy, and Practice, and a faculty affiliate in Anthropology and Ethnic Studies at the University of Colorado, Boulder Andrea Dyrness in a conversation reflecting on their work with youth and communities.

  1. March 9, 2022 - 9:00am

Public Seminar Series, Hilary term 2022

Race, Borders, and Global (Im)mobility

Series convenor: Dr Hanno Brankamp, Departmental Lecturer in Forced Migration

This seminar series critically interrogates the ways in which militarised borders, migration enforcement, and their racial orderings continue to be normalised on a global scale. The political drive towards expanding walls, policing infrastructures, camps, detention centres, interceptions at sea, push backs, deportations, surveillance, and racist immigration policies that restrict asylum and migration is hereby not only a legacy of past empires but is also indicative of new emerging geographies of (im)mobility, racialisation, and liberal violence. Speakers in this series come from a range of disciplines and will examine global migration through questions of race and racism, coloniality, nationalism, citizenship, belonging, criminalization, and bordering.

 

  1. March 9, 2022 - 9:00am to 10:30am

This two-day virtual symposium explores the relationship between borders, captivity, and memory, and how it shapes the racialization of migration and the construction of national identity. Given Italy’s porous position as a Southern European nation with complex histories of internal migration, emigration, and immigration, Italy and the Mediterranean region are critical contexts for understanding how processes of migration, racialization, and transcultural mediation have shaped public and cultural discourse about identity and belonging from nineteenth century emigration and colonialism, to today's arrivals via the Mediterranean Sea. This symposium brings together scholars, writers, practitioners, activists, and students working in multiple fields and historical periods to explore questions of migration, incarceration, race, and memory in Italy and the Mediterranean in a transnational and transhistorical perspective.

Each of the symposium’s two thematic days (9:45am - 4:15pm ET) will feature two roundtable discussions, a keynote session, and reflection sessions for undergraduate and graduate students.
• Friday, March 18: “Racial Justice and the Black Mediterranean," including a keynote discussion with Camilla Hawthorne and Angelica Pesarini, moderated by Simone Brioni and Teresa Fiore (register below)
• Friday, April 8: "Language, Identity and Representation in Transnational Italy," including a keynote discussion with Amara Lakhous and Igiaba Scego, moderated by Ron Kubati and Loredana Polezzi (register to attend at [insert link])
This event is open to all, and we encourage student participation.

  1. March 18, 2022

Over two days, scholars, writers, practitioners, activists, and students across institutions are coming together virtually to explore the relationship between borders, captivity, and memory, and how it shapes the racialization of migration and the construction of national identity.

Given Italy’s porous position as a southern European nation with complex histories of internal migration, emigration, and immigration, Italy and the Mediterranean region are critical contexts for understanding how processes of migration, racialization, and transcultural mediation have shaped public and cultural discourse about identity and belonging from nineteenth century emigration and colonialism, to today’s arrivals via the Mediterranean Sea.

  1. April 8, 2022

Register for this book talk from the Center for Comparative Studies Immigration Studies. Heba Gowayed will discuss her book Refuge which follows Syrians who fled a brutal war in their homeland as they attempt to rebuild in countries of resettlement and refuge.

  1. April 8, 2022 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm

Join the Boston Area Migration Workshop and Boston University Sociology for a conversation between Neda MaghboulehRhacel Parreñas, Victor Ray and Heba Gowayed on her new book Refuge published with Princeton University Press. The conversation will be led and moderated by Nazli Kibria.

As the world confronts the largest refugee crisis since World War II, wealthy countries are being called upon to open their doors to the displaced, with the assumption that this will restore their prospects for a bright future. Refuge follows Syrians who fled a brutal war in their homeland as they attempt to rebuild in countries of resettlement and asylum. Their experiences reveal that these destination countries are not saviors; they can deny newcomers’ potential by failing to recognize their abilities and invest in the tools they need to prosper.

Centering the human experience of displacement, Refuge shines needed light on how countries structure the potential of people, new arrivals or otherwise, within their borders.

 

  1. May 12, 2022 - 10:00am to 11:30am

Featured

  1. December 1, 2021 - 8:45pm

Professor Daniel Masterson- along with other researchers from the Immigration Policy Lab at Stanford University and ETH Zurich, a Swiss university, and the London School of Economics- recently had their research featured in The Economist. The article,“Here to Stay, However Miserable: Making Life Hard for Syrian Refugees Will Not Compel Them to Leave” was published in the January 9, 2021 edition. 

  1. November 26, 2021 - 7:15pm

 

The award, for $225,000, will fund a year-long seminar series in 2021-2022, through which these principal investigators will convene leading scholars from around to the world to examine the intersections of global migration, racial identity, and precarity in France, South Korea, and California.

  1. April 24, 2021 - 11:15am to November 25, 2021 - 11:15am

  1. February 26, 2021 - 9:45pm to March 30, 2021 - 9:45pm

  1. August 28, 2020 - 10:45am to August 30, 2020 - 10:45am

  1. June 15, 2020 - 12:30pm to July 31, 2020 - 12:30pm

  1. January 7, 2020 - 1:00pm
The Organization of American Historians (OAH) has named Verónica Castillo-Muñoz as a Distinguished Lecturer. She is a UC-Santa Barbara historian and expert in gender history, American history and Latin America. Read more!
  1. December 31, 2019 - 12:00pm

Wang is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Geography at UCSB and the first GloCal Health Fellowship from the University of California Global Health Institute (UCGHI). She works with professor Susan Cassels

  1. December 30, 2019

Mexican Americans are unique in the panoply of American ethno-racial groups in that they are the descendants  of the largest and longest lasting  immigration stream in US history. Today, there are approximately 24 million Americans of Mexican descent living in the United   States, many of  whosefamilies have been in the US for several generations. Read more!

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